Law@theMargins: Cultivating the Democratic Scholar and Advancing Democratic Scholarship

By Chaumtoli Huq Creating Law@theMargins was deliberate and intentional to create a platform from which to collectivize the development and promotion of ideas on social justice and put into practice the idea of democratic scholarship, which I hope to be the theoretical foundation to this project.  It was ambitiously intended to create a platform to challenge how ideas are formed, created, and promoted.  There, I write and curate pieces from…

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Perspectives: No Access to Justice When Employers Use Police Force to Control Farmworkers

By  Lori Johnson, an attorney with the Farmworker Unit of Legal Aid of North Carolina As a farmworker attorney in North Carolina, simply meeting with my clients poses an ongoing challenge.  This reality became clear to me several years ago while meeting with a client outside his home. A squad car pulled into the yard, and fear washed over my client’s face. My client’s employer sought trespass charges against me,…

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Perspectives: Housing is a Human Right

By Rob Robinson, Take Back the Land Leadership Committee The movement should be led by impacted communities, primarily women of color.  This core principle of Take Back the Land (TBTL) stands front and center on this December 10th, 2013, a day that is recognized around the world as Human Rights Day.  TBTL is a network of grassroots organizations from around the country which uses non-violent civil disobedience and direct action…

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Perspectives: Mobilizing for Justice in the Tea Gardens in Assam

By Francesca Feruglio Background on Assam’s Tea Gardens and Nazdeek The State of Assam, in North-East India, is home to more than half of India’s tea production and one sixth of the world’s production. However, thousands of tea garden workers living and working on the gardens have yet to benefit from such large-scale profit. Over 150 years ago Adivasi (indigenous) communities, were forcibly brought to Assam from India’s Central States…

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Perspectives: “Children’s Place” as Orphans in Rana Plaza Tragedy

By Shahinur Begum, Researcher, Sramabikesh Kendra of UBINIG (Center for Labor Education)  Introduction Women wage earners are the cheapest in Bangladesh due to the socio-economic condition of the country, which is why so many girls are employed in the garment industry.  About 3.2 million workers are engaged in these factories and 95% of them are women.  Now there are about 5,000 garment factories since its inception in late 1970s.  Women…

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Campaign for Children Impacted by Rana Plaza Tragedy

  United Students Against Sweatshops and International Labor Rights Forum  have an ongoing campaign to seek compensation for the children of Rana Plaza.  For more information, see: The Orphan’s Place (http://orphansplace.com)  The Children’s Place produced apparel at Rana Plaza before the factory collapsed in a horrific industrial homicide, killing 1,132 garment workers and leaving children without a parent, grandparent, brother, or sister.

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Perspectives: Democracy, we have a problem: Religion

Lailufar Yasmin is an Associate Professor with Department of International Relations, University of Dhaka, Bangladesh, and currently undertaking research on ‘secularism in International Relations’ at Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia. Immanuel Kant, a principle theorist on secularism proposed that human beings should assume responsibility for their acts in the public sphere instead of taking refuge to some divine explanation for such acts. Referring to the principles of secularism, Kant suggested that…

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Bioethics, Scientific Research and the GMO Debate

“Concern for man himself and his fate must always form the chief interest of all technical endeavors…in order that the creations of our minds shall be a blessing and not a curse to mankind.  Never forget this in the midst of your diagrams and equations.” – Albert Einstein’s Speech to students at California Institute of Technology on February 16, 1931 “Science is a wonderful thing if one does not have to…

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Perspectives: Black Workers, the Public Sector and the Future of Labor Unions

Bill Fletcher, Jr. is an internationally known racial justice, labor and global justice activist and writer.  The attacks on the public sector over the last several years by the political Right have brought forward increasing concerns about the impact of such assaults on communities of color generally, and workers of color in particular.  Economists, such as Dr. Steven C. Pitts at UC-Berkeley Labor Center, have called attention to the impact…

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